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that challenges economic orthodoxy

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and support a global network of new economic thinkers

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Featured Editorial Collections

Is Green Growth Possible?

Collection

Economists debate whether catastrophic global warming can be stopped while maintaining current levels of economic growth. Enno Schröder, Servaas Storm, Gregor Semieniuk, Lance Taylor, and Armon Rezai find there is a tradeoff between growth and decarbonization, while Michael Grubb responds with more optimism.

Economic Growth and Carbon Emissions: The Road to ‘Hothouse Earth’ is Paved with Good Intentions

Paper By Enno Schröder and Servaas Storm

Wishful thinking and tinkering won’t cut it. Nothing short of a mass mobilization for deep de-carbonization across the global economy can avert the looming climate catastrophe.

Why “Green Growth” Is an Illusion

Article By Enno Schröder and Servaas Storm

Wishful thinking and tinkering won’t cut it. Nothing short of a mass mobilization for deep de-carbonization across the global economy can avert the looming climate catastrophe. 

The Inconvenient Truth about Climate Change and the Economy

Article By Gregor Semieniuk, Lance Taylor, and Armon Rezai

The new IPCC Report is overly optimistic about global productivity growth and fossil fuel energy use. More dramatic, immediate action is needed

Conditional Optimism: Economic Perspectives on Deep Decarbonization

Article By Michael Grubb

A response to economists who doubt our capacity to decarbonize while maintaining robust growth

A Reply to Michael Grubb’s Growth-Decarbonization Optimism from Schröder and Storm

Article By Enno Schröder and Servaas Storm

Market tweaks and incentives won’t save us from climate catastrophe. Only radical policy change will.

A Reply to Michael Grubb’s Growth-Decarbonization Optimism from Semieniuk et al

Article By Gregor Semieniuk, Lance Taylor, and Armon Rezai

Hope for mitigating climate catastrophe may not be lost, but the scale of political change needed is no cause for optimism

Diversity and Pluralism in Economics

Collection

This new series will explore different takes on and claims about the challenges of women and minorities in economics, opening up a debate on a range of questions.

Fighting for Gender Equality in Economics Is Not Nearly Enough

Article By ​Orsola Costantini and Giulia Zacchia

The field of economics is aggressively sexist and biased against new and unconventional ideas. Revelations about gender and ethnic discrimination show the need to reorient the whole system toward more freedom, respect, openness, and pluralism. But how?

Sex, Power, and the Perils of Economic Writing

Article By Lynn Parramore

For women discussing economics, it’s still easier to be seen than heard

Why We Need Diversity and Pluralism in Economics, Part I

Article By ​Orsola Costantini and Giulia Zacchia

INET talks to Alicia Bárcena Ibarra, Claudia Goldin, and Maria Cristina Marcuzzo

Diversity and Excellence: Not A Zero Sum Game

Article By Besiana Balla, Devika Dutt, Naomi Friedman-Sokuler, Ingrid Harvold Kvangraven, Jenny Tue Anh Nguyen, Lilian Rolim, and Reinhard Schumacher

As young scholars, we have formulated a new plan for fostering diversity in both identity and scholarly thinking in economics—preconditions for academic rigor.

Krishna Bharadwaj, the Torchbearer of Economics

Article By Maria Cristina Marcuzzo

During her long career she illuminated many of the shortcomings of neoclassicism, and offered alternative paths

Why We Need Diversity and Pluralism in Economics, Part II

Article By ​Orsola Costantini and Giulia Zacchia

INET talks to Jayati Ghosh and Marina Della Giusta

More collections

Working Paper Series

Lost in Deflation

Paper By Servaas Storm

Why Italy’s woes are a warning to the whole Eurozone

Economic Consequences of the U.S. Convict Labor System

Paper By Michael Poyker

Prisoners employed in manufacturing constitute 4.2% of total U.S. manufacturing employment in 2005; they produce cheap goods, creating labor demand shock.

The Knightian Uncertainty Hypothesis: Unforeseeable Change and Muth’s Consistency Constraint in Modeling Aggregate Outcomes

Paper By Roman Frydman, Søren Johansen, Anders Rahbek, and Morten Tabor

This paper introduces the Knightian Uncertainty Hypothesis (KUH), a new approach to macroeconomics and finance theory.

New Evidence on the Portfolio Balance Approach to Currency Returns

Paper By Nevin Cavusoglu, Michael Goldberg, and Josh Stillwagon

Asset markets are indispensable in harnessing society’s diverse views and insights about future business performance. But those views are shaped as much by emotion and crowd mentality as by rational expectations.

The Contributions of Socioeconomic and Opioid Supply Factors to Geographic Variation in U.S. Drug Mortality Rates

Paper By Shannon Monnat

Economic distress in rural areas and opioid exposure in cities are key indicators of overdose deaths

Labor Laws and Manufacturing Performance in India: How Priors Trump Evidence and Progress Gets Stalled

Paper By Servaas Storm

For years, governments in India and much of the developing world have followed the advice of a paper arguing that labor regulations actually hurt workers. The problem? The research was wrong.

Estimates of the Natural Rate of Interest and the Stance of Monetary Policies: A Critical Assessment

Paper By Enrico Sergio Levrero

Starting with the literature on the estimates of the natural rate of interest, this paper critically analyzes the modern practice of identifying the benchmark rate of monetary policy with an equilibrium or neutral interest rate reflecting “fundamental forces” unaffected by monetary factors.

Finance in Economic Growth: Eating the Family Cow

Paper By Peter Temin

The American economy changed rapidly in the last half-century. The National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) were designed before these changes started. They have stretched to accommodate new and growing service activities, but they are still organized for an industrial economy.

More papers