Dean Baker co-founded CEPR in 1999. His areas of research include housing and macroeconomics, intellectual property, Social Security, Medicare and European labor markets. He is the author of several books, including Rigged: How Globalization and the Rules of the Modern Economy Were Structured to Make the Rich Richer. His blog, “Beat the Press,” provides commentary on economic reporting. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Michigan.

His analyses have appeared in many major publications, including the ###em, the Washington Post, the London Financial Times, and the New York Daily News. He received his Ph.D in economics from the University of Michigan.

By this expert

Missing Voters and Missing Unemployed Black Workers

Article | Mar 3, 2021

Like Republicans with political polls, unemployed Black workers are underrepresented in federal employment data because of non-response.

Masking Real Unemployment: The Overall and Racial Impact of Survey Non-Response on Measured Labor Market Outcomes

Paper Working Paper Series | | Mar 2021

A large and growing percentage of households are missed in the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS).

Innovation, Intellectual Property, and Development

Paper Conference paper | | Oct 2017

A better set of approaches for the 21st century.

The Economics of the Affordable Care Act

Article | Jan 17, 2017

Any effort to replace the Affordable Care Act will be confronted by the same structural imbalances in the health care economy that the legislation’s authors faced

Featuring this expert

Arjun Jayadev has an article in the NY Times on the crisis of access to affordable medicines and the need to suspend intellectual property rights

News Dec 7, 2020

“the vaccines developed by these companies were developed thanks wholly or partly to taxpayer money. Those vaccines essentially belong to the people — and yet the people are about to pay for them again, and with little prospect of getting as many as they need fast enough. … mounting pressure from poor countries at the W.T.O. should give the governments of rich countries leverage to negotiate with their pharmaceutical companies for cheaper drugs and vaccines worldwide. Leaning on those companies is the right thing to do in the face of a global pandemic; it is also the best way for the governments of rich countries to take care of their own populations, which in some cases experience more severe drug shortages than do people in far less affluent places.” — Achal Prabhala, Arjun Jayadev and Dean Baker

Intellectual Property Watch: Patents Without Examination

News Apr 30, 2018

INET Senior Economist Arjun Jayadev and Dean Baker explore the patent system of Brazil, and its implications for developing countries.