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James K. Boyce is a professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and director of the environment program at the Political Economy Research Institute. His latest book is Economics, the Environment, and Our Common Wealth (2013). His previous books include Reclaiming Nature: Environmental Justice and Ecological Restoration (2007); Natural Assets: Democratizing Environmental Ownership (2003); and The Political Economy of the Environment (2002). He is president of Econ4: Economics for People, the Planet and the Future.

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Carbon Dividends: The Bipartisan Key to Climate Policy?

Article | Feb 13, 2017

The practical question in Washington today is not whether regulations will go, but whether anything will replace them

Let Them Drink Pollution?

Article | Jan 26, 2016

The tragic crisis in Flint, Michigan, where residents have been poisoned by lead contamination, is not just about drinking water. And it’s not just about Flint. It’s about race and class, and the stark contradiction between the American dream of equal rights and opportunity for all and the American nightmare of metastasizing inequality of wealth and power.

Three Measures of Environmental Inequality

Paper Working Paper Series | | Apr 2014

Using data on industrial air pollution exposure in the United States, we compute three measures of environmental inequality: the Gini coefficient of exposure, the ratio of median exposure of minorities to that of non-Hispanic whites, and the ratio of median exposure of poor households to that of nonpoor households.

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