Perry G. Mehrling

Involvement

Perry G. Mehrling, Professor of Economics, joined the faculty of Barnard College in 1987, where he teaches courses on the economics of money and banking, the history of money and finance, and the financial dimensions of the U.S. retirement, health, and education systems. His most recent book is The New Lombard Street: How the Fed became the dealer of last resort (Princeton 2011). His best-known book Fischer Black and the Revolutionary Idea of Finance (Wiley 2005, 2012) has recently been released in a revised paperback edition. Currently, Prof. Mehrling directs the educational initiatives of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, one of which is his course Economics of Money and Banking, available on Coursera at www.coursera.org/course/money.


By this expert

The IMF and the Collateral Crunch

Article | Dec 9, 2011

Why is the IMF getting involved in the Eurocrisis, and why is its involvement taking the form of lending to individual member states of the Eurozone?

First the ECB, then the IMF, Part One

Article | Dec 5, 2011

The fact of the matter is that European bank funding markets are collapsing onto the ECB balance sheet.

Financial (De)Globalization and the European Experiment

Article | Nov 22, 2011

Europe is embarked on a grand experiment, managing modern financial crisis without a dealer of last resort, so refusing to follow the lead of the 2008 Fed.

Liquidity, Public and Private

Article | Nov 15, 2011

A week ago, Mark Carney, chairman of the Financial Stability Board, warned of emerging global consequences of the escalating eurozone crisis.

Featuring this expert

Paul Samuelson and the Neoclassical Synthesis

Video | Jul 24, 2011

Paul Samuelson was both a mathematical micro-economist, working from theorem to proof in the neoclassical tradition, and a committed Keynesian macroeconomist, convinced of the necessity of policy intervention to improve the performance of market economies. How did he square these two sides of himself? Wade Hands goes into the archives to find out.

When Banks Fail, the Case of Japan

Video | Jul 24, 2011

What happens to Main Street when Wall Street fails? Japan expert David Weinstein squeezes a unique data set to answer this question.

Modeling Asset Markets when Knowledge is Ambiguous

Video | Jul 19, 2011

When you flip a coin, you expect heads and tails to show up with a 50% chance each. But what if all you knew was that heads and tails each have a chance of at least 25%? That’s how Scott Condie captures Knightian uncertainty in asset markets.

How Economists Used to Be Made

Video | Jul 17, 2011

Economists aren’t born, they’re made. Irwin Collier digs into archives to find out how Paul Samuelson and his generation were made.