Perry G. Mehrling

Involvement

Perry G. Mehrling, Professor of Economics, joined the faculty of Barnard College in 1987, where he teaches courses on the economics of money and banking, the history of money and finance, and the financial dimensions of the U.S. retirement, health, and education systems. His most recent book is The New Lombard Street: How the Fed became the dealer of last resort (Princeton 2011). His best-known book Fischer Black and the Revolutionary Idea of Finance (Wiley 2005, 2012) has recently been released in a revised paperback edition. Currently, Prof. Mehrling directs the educational initiatives of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, one of which is his course Economics of Money and Banking, available on Coursera at www.coursera.org/course/money.


By this expert

The Economics of Money & Banking

Course

Learn to read, understand, and evaluate professional discourse about the current operation of money markets at the level of the Financial Times.

Can Bitcoin Replace the Dollar?

Article | Oct 14, 2017

Financial Globalization and its Cryptocurrency Discontents

Monetary Policy in a Post-Crisis World: Beyond the Taylor Rule

Article | Sep 9, 2016

We know about emergency lending, but what we are missing is the macroeconomic framework to guide a new rule for stabilization policy

Monetary Policy Family Reunion at Jackson Hole

Article | Aug 31, 2016

Like any family reunion, the Jackson Hole Economic Symposium may have been as significant for what was said as it was for what was not discussed

Featuring this expert

YSI North America Convening

YSI Event Regional Convening YSI | Feb 22–24, 2019

On February 22-24, 2019, the Young Scholars Initiative (YSI) will host its North America Convening in Los Angeles.

Reawakening

From the Origins of Economic Ideas to the Challenges of Our Time

Event Plenary | Oct 21–23, 2017

INET gathered hundreds of new economic thinkers in Edinburgh to discuss the past, present, and future of the economics profession.

General Equilibrium Theory: Sound and Fury, Signifying Nothing?

Article | Aug 16, 2016

Does general equilibrium theory sufficiently enhance our understanding of the economic process to make the entire exercise worthwhile, if we consider that other forms of thinking may have been ‘crowded out’ as a result of its being the ‘dominant discourse’? What, in the end, have we really learned from it?