Nicholas Mangee

I am currently an associate professor of finance in the Parker College of Business at Georgia Southern University and a research associate for the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) program on Knightian Uncertainty Economics (KUE). My research focuses on testing the implications of macro-finance models based on KUE by investigating the relative roles and dynamics between market fundamentals, psychology, and social context in explaining instability in stock price fluctuations. I earned my doctoral degree at the University of New Hampshire. My research has received attention from financial press outlets such as The Economist and Bloomberg News and has been featured prominently in the book Beyond Mechanical Markets: Asset Price Swings, Risk, and the Role of the State - a 2011 finalist for the Paul Samuelson Prize.

By this expert

When Knightian Uncertainty Becomes Obvious

Article | Oct 7, 2021

Stock-Price Volatility During the Pandemic

Expectations Concordance and Stock Market Volatility: Knightian Uncertainty in the Year of the Pandemic

Paper Working Paper Series | | Oct 2021

Stock-Price Volatility During the Pandemic

How Market Sentiment Underpins Knightian Uncertainty

Article | May 7, 2020

We find empirical evidence that changes in market sentiment drive unforeseeable change in how stock returns unfold over time, thereby engendering Knightian uncertainty.

How Market Sentiment Drives Forecasts of Stock Returns

Paper Working Paper Series | | May 2020

We reveal a novel channel through which market participants’ sentiment influences how they forecast stock returns: their optimism (pessimism) affects the weights they assign to fundamentals.

Featuring this expert

INET Announces Program on Knightian Uncertainity Economics

News Mar 4, 2019

Rethinking the role of markets and government policy in light of our inherently limited ability to foresee economic and social outcomes

Knightian Uncertainty Economics (KUE)

Research Program

Rethinking the role of markets and government policy in light of our inherently limited ability to foresee economic and social outcomes