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Benjamin Page

Professor Page’s interests include public opinion and policy making, the mass media, empirical democratic theory, political economy, policy formation, the presidency, and American foreign policy. His research interests include public opinion, policy making, the mass media, and U.S. foreign policy. He is currently engaged in a large collaborative project to study Economically Successful Americans and the Common Good. More information about this project is available.

Books  

  • Living with the Dragon: How the American Public Views the Rise of China(with Tao Xie, Columbia University Press, 2010)
  • Class War? What Americans Really Think about Economic Inequality (with Lawrence R. Jacobs, University of Chicago Press, 2009)
  • The Rational Public: Fifty Years of Trends in Americans’ Policy Preferences (with Robert Shapiro, University of Chicago Press, 1992)
  • Who Deliberates? Mass Media in Modern Democracy (University of Chicago Press, 1996)
  • What Government Can Do: Dealing with Poverty and Inequality (with James Simmons, University of Chicago Press, 2000)

Select Publications

  • “Effects of Public Opinion on Policy,” (American Political Science Review)
  • “What Moves Public Opinion,” (American Political Science Review)

By this expert

Economic Distress Did Drive Trump’s Win

Article | Oct 31, 2018

Contrary to the dominant media narrative, social issues like racism and sexism on their own can’t explain Trump’s success.

The Economic and Social Roots of Populist Rebellion: Support for Donald Trump in 2016

Paper Working Paper Series | | Oct 2018

This paper critically analyzes voting patterns in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

The Hinge of Fate? Economic and Social Populism in the 2016 Presidential Election A Preliminary Exploration

Paper Conference paper | | Oct 2017

Support for populism is often attributed to xenophobia, racism, sexism; to anger and resentment at immigrants, racial or ethnic minorities, or “uppity” non-traditional women. According to these accounts , people who feel socially resentful may reject established politicians as favoring those “others” over people like themselves, and turn to outsider populistic leaders.

Featuring this expert

The Intercept: Donald Trump Exploited Long-Term Economic Distress to Fuel His Election Victory, Study Finds

News Oct 31, 2018

The Intercept covers a new INET paper from our Research Director Tom Ferguson and his co-authors.