Perry G. Mehrling

Involvement

Perry G. Mehrling, Professor of Economics, joined the faculty of Barnard College in 1987, where he teaches courses on the economics of money and banking, the history of money and finance, and the financial dimensions of the U.S. retirement, health, and education systems. His most recent book is The New Lombard Street: How the Fed became the dealer of last resort (Princeton 2011). His best-known book Fischer Black and the Revolutionary Idea of Finance (Wiley 2005, 2012) has recently been released in a revised paperback edition. Currently, Prof. Mehrling directs the educational initiatives of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, one of which is his course Economics of Money and Banking, available on Coursera at www.coursera.org/course/money.


By this expert

World Without Money Reconsidered

Article | Apr 7, 2012

FT Alphaville has picked up on my friend James Sweeney’s latest, and since James cites the latest writings by other friends Zoltan Pozsar, Manmohan Singh, as well as my own most recent, the piece reads like a discussant’s comments on a shadow banking symposium.

Renminbi Swap Lines

Article | Mar 28, 2012

Last week the central banks of China and Australia announced the creation of a $31bn currency swap line

Eurocrisis Redux

Article | Mar 12, 2012

Entangling alliances or entangling leagues are nothing to the entanglements of cash owing—Keynes

Crisis Averted: Understanding LTRO2

Article | Feb 29, 2012

Fundamentally, the ECB is trying to keep the ongoing sovereign debt crisis from turning into a full-fledged bank credit crisis.

Featuring this expert

Measuring Systemic Risk To Empower the Taxpayer

Video | Aug 22, 2011

Banks take on excessive risk since they know, in case of failure, the taxpayer will step in to rescue them. That is a form of free insurance, and Ed Kane wants to end it.

How Government Helps, and Wall Street Hurts, the Innovative Enterprise

Video | Aug 21, 2011

Innovation drives economic growth and welfare, and the industrial corporation drives innovation, says William Lazonick. But just how do corporations innovate?

The Coase Theorem As Fiction

Video | Aug 17, 2011

When externalities are present and transaction costs are absent, private parties will strike welfare-enhancing deals regardless of who owns what. In a frictionless world, bargaining leads to efficiency. That is the essence of the Coase Theorem, and it is fiction, according to Steven Medema.

Financial Fragility in a Network of Trade Credit

Video | Aug 16, 2011

The physicist Sorin Solomon begins to feel dizzy when the economist Leanne Ussher talks econ lingo. Yet he listens, because the two of them have found a productive area of collaboration: some economic phenomena, they find, can be explained without recourse to the quirks that feed into human decision making.