Perry G. Mehrling

Involvement

Perry G. Mehrling is professor of economics at Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University. He was professor of economics at Barnard College in New York City for 30 years. There, he taught courses on the economics of money and banking, the history of money and finance, and the financial dimensions of the U.S. retirement, health, and education systems. His most recent book is The New Lombard Street: How the Fed became the dealer of last resort (Princeton 2011). His best-known book Fischer Black and the Revolutionary Idea of Finance (Wiley 2005, 2012) has recently been released in a revised paperback edition. Currently, Prof. Mehrling directs the educational initiatives of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, one of which is his course Economics of Money and Banking, available on Coursera at www.coursera.org/course/money.


By this expert

Economics in Uncertain Times

Article | Nov 2, 2011

My first TV chat show performance:

Euro Summit Statement Explained

Article | Oct 27, 2011

Okay, so here is the statement, but what does it mean? Felix Salmon offers an unnamed advisor’s flowchart. Let’s see if Money View thinking can do better.

Margin Call--"Mama there's wolves in the house"

Article | Oct 23, 2011

Jack Bauer comes to Wall Street, in the person of Sam Rogers, played by Kevin Spacey.

Making Markets

Article | Oct 17, 2011

Plumbing Matters

Featuring this expert

How Economists Used to Be Made

Video | Jul 17, 2011

Economists aren’t born, they’re made. Irwin Collier digs into archives to find out how Paul Samuelson and his generation were made.

Why Economics Needs History

Video | Jul 10, 2011

What challenges will China have to surmount in order to make its currency a true international currency?

How Investors Use Stories to Tame Uncertainty

Video | Jul 4, 2011

If you want to understand how fund managers choose a portfolio, why not ask them?

Microfoundations for the Vision of Minsky

Video | Jun 12, 2011

Delli Gatti starts where his dissertation advisor, Hyman Minsky, left off.