Perry G. Mehrling

Involvement

Perry G. Mehrling, Professor of Economics, joined the faculty of Barnard College in 1987, where he teaches courses on the economics of money and banking, the history of money and finance, and the financial dimensions of the U.S. retirement, health, and education systems. His most recent book is The New Lombard Street: How the Fed became the dealer of last resort (Princeton 2011). His best-known book Fischer Black and the Revolutionary Idea of Finance (Wiley 2005, 2012) has recently been released in a revised paperback edition. Currently, Prof. Mehrling directs the educational initiatives of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, one of which is his course Economics of Money and Banking, available on Coursera at www.coursera.org/course/money.


By this expert

Why did the ECB LTROs help?

Article | Jan 22, 2012

From a money view perspective, the central issue is settlement of TARGET balances between national central banks within the Eurozone, and the key is to understand TARGET balances as a kind of interbank correspondent balance.

Does the Current Account Still Matter?

Article | Jan 12, 2012

The title is the same as that of Maury Obstfeld’s Ely Lecture, delivered Jan 6 at the AEA meetings in Chicago. Yours truly was at the meetings mainly to deliver a paper on “Three Principles for Market-Based Credit Regulation”, about which more in a later post. And for most of the rest of the time I was locked in a hotel room interviewing candidates for an assistant professor slot at Barnard College (which gave me a good overview of the current state of macroeconomics, again fodder for a later post).

Heterodoxy and The Economist

Article | Jan 3, 2012

When I started this blog, almost exactly one year ago today, my thought was to provide commentary on the financial events of the day, using the Financial Times as my primary source of information about those events.

John Whittaker: Eurosystem balances explained

Article | Dec 12, 2011

[The following guest post is by John Whittaker, from whom we have learned much of what we know about how the European payments system works. See his terrific papers here and here, both of which reward close study. He has been looking over the last couple Money View posts, and the comments to those posts, and has this to say.]

Featuring this expert

Why Is There a Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics?

Video | Aug 16, 2011

The Nobel Memorial Prize defines high achievement in economics, and it validates the discipline’s claim for scientific authority. And yet, historically, it can be understood as a reflection of domestic policy conflicts in Sweden.

Banks: How Big Is too Big?

Video | Aug 15, 2011

We all know it: The financial sector is bloated and banks are too big to fail. But just how bloated is it, and how much should it be shrunk?

How to Avoid Herding in Research

Video | Aug 15, 2011

An individual fish reduces the danger to itself by swimming as close as possible to the center of the school. That is how schools hold together.

What Finance (and Economics) Can Learn from Law

Video | Aug 14, 2011

Without law and legal institutions, financial markets won’t work. That’s what economists discovered about 15 years ago, when former socialist countries turned towards capitalism.